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See full summary » At a Christmastime event, Jenna shares an impromptu, unforgettable kiss with the dashing billionaire, Cooper Montgomery.Unaware of his intentions and fearful of getting hurt in another ... Achtemeier writes: "The letter, therefore, beginning with a carefully crafted exordium whose purpose was to win the attention of the audience, followed by a series of topical discussions and concluding with a peroration, shows elements of judicial and epideictic structures, but seems to reflect most closely the deliberative rhetoric of its Hellenistic age.Whether or nto the author set out deliberatively to craft a letter that included such elements of formal Hellenistic rhetoric is difficult to say, although it would be equally difficult to deny him all acquaintance with formal rhetoric in light of the shape of the letter itself." (, p. Stop over praying and overanalyzing and start asking!After you go out, call her again and ask her out again. Then if you decide that it just isn’t there, be straightforward.The apostle Peter probably knew some Greek, but 1 Peter does not look like the product of an unlettered (Acts ) Galilean fisherman.

Kingdom of God is the domain of God Even though Jesus is not physically, visibly present among us as people His eternal Kingdom remains something we can enter into [via the Holy Spirit] even at this very moment.See full summary » After Fiona gets dumped, she escapes to her family's Vermont Inn for a few days to evaluate her life. I loved the angle of a non-Christian pretending to be an evangelical to catch a Christian guy. It gently skewers a few foibles of the Christian culture while still being respectful and pro-Christian.When her ex Nate shows up with a new girlfriend, Fiona devises a plan to win him back: pretend head chef Derek is her new boyfriend. A top-notch career, killer wardrobe, dream apartment, and great friends - she thinks the only thing missing is a man. Lacey Chabert did a charming job and was quite funny in places.But the problem is not simply that of citation from the Greek Septuagint but also that of the unconsious influence that follows from regular familiarity with the text. Achtemeier writes: "The intimate acquaintance of our author with the Greek language is shown by the text of the OT which the author quotes and to which he alludes frequently: it is the LXX rather than the MT.Direct quotation is limited to two instances (, 2:6), and there the text is rather clearly the LXX ( from Lev 19:2; 2:6 from Isa 40:6-8, though with modifications); additional clear examples of quotation would include Isa 40:6-8 at -25 and Ps -17 (MT Ps 34) at -12, in both instances with modifications.